memoirs, art and fragments by Thomas Milner

Dover Beach

During the early nineteen sixties the Port of Dover still had medium-priced respectable hotels with names like The White Cliffs with potted plants in the lounge and middle-aged bow-tied pianists playing sub-Cole Porter numbers with rolling eyes and a sort of louche panache.

The town itself with its tangy sea-air, its cries of sea-gulls and its dazzling white cliffs seemed to offer shelter and solace from the long and confusing journey through childhood.

And later, as the ship edged out of the stone harbour of my boyhood to meet the butting pitching sea, I would linger in the stern watching the shoreline of England – those famous gleaming white cliffs – receding to the horizon and feel an unfamiliar ache in my heart.

(I have since discovered that the Portuguese language, that melancholy vehicle, encapsulates that emotion in one single word – saudades).

LEAVES IN POT – by THOMAS MILNER

But let’s bury these memories and share with me one of my favourite poems.

Written by Mathew Arnold in 1869 it is called DOVER BEACH

The sea is calm to-night.
The tide is full, the moon lies fair
Upon the straits; – on the French coast the light
Gleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand;
Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay.
Come to the window, sweet is the night-air!
Only, from the long line of spray
Where the sea meets the moon-blanched land,
Listen! you hear the grating roar
Of pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling,
At their return, up the high strand,
Begin, and cease, and then again begin,
With tremulous cadence slow, and bring
The eternal note of sadness in.

Sophocles long ago
Heard it on the A gaean, and it brought
Into his mind the turbid ebb and flow
Of human misery; we
Find also in the sound a thought,
Hearing it by this distant northern sea.

The Sea of Faith
Was once, too, at the full, and round earth’s shore
Lay like the folds of a bright girdle furled.
But now I only hear
Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar,
Retreating, to the breath
Of the night-wind, down the vast edges drear
And naked shingles of the world.
Ah, love, let us be true
To one another! for the world, which seems
To lie before us like a land of dreams,
So various, so beautiful, so new,
Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light,
Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain;
And we are here as on a darkling plain
Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
Where ignorant armies clash by night.


Comments on: "Dover Beach" (2)

  1. I have been to Dover, and have also seen the white cliffs from afar. If those are in your blood, there is something pure and rugged about you.
    I have loved this poem since high school, which stands to reason as I am such a darkling, Keats and I both. Thank you for the “Leaves in Pot” colourful cheer. I hope you are having a wonderful weekend, Tom. ~ Lily

    Like

    • Thanks Lily, I have poignant memories of Dover associated with going to/from Boarding School …Mathew Arnold is not a fashionable poet these days; did you know that he was the son of Thomas Arnold, the headmaster of Rugby School when/where the Game was invented (see TOM BROWN’S SCHOOLDAYS)? Sorry about that, it’s the pedagogue in me … have a good weekend!

      Like

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