memoirs, art and fragments by Thomas Milner

Posts tagged ‘nobel prize for literature’

Saramago & Censorship

CHARLES DARWIN

CHARLES DARWIN

I read somewhere that during the time of Portuguese dictator, Antonio Salazar, The Origin of the Species by Charles Darwin was banned.

BANNED BOOKS

BANNED BOOKS

Several Portuguese intellectuals have showed how the various forms of censorship have hindered the cultural development of Portugal with the cultural elite becoming something of an aristocracy, disconnected from the rest of the population.

This is evident by the prevalence of a gap between popular culture and high culture, with the arraiais (popular gathering with light music and ball dancing), pimba music (based on double-entendre or straightforward sexual slang) and racho folclórico (folk and ethnological dancing and music groups) on one side, and literature, drama and classical music on the other.

I stepped from one side of the divide to the other.

Portugal has become one of the countries in Europe with the lowest attendances of theatre and the lowest rates of book-reading.

So during my years here, in this place,

Physically I have taken one step forward

Spiritually I have taken one step sideways

But culturally I have I have taken one step backward

Of course, philosophically, none of this should matter

But it matters to me

It matters to me

JOSÉ SARAMAGO

JOSÉ SARAMAGO

In 1992 the Under-Secretary of State for Culture, Souza Lara, who had final say on applications from Portugal, prevented José Saramago’s The Gospel According to Jesus Christ from participating in the European Literary Award, positing that the work, rather than being representative of Portugal, was divisive for the Portuguese people.

As a result and in protest against what he saw as an act of censorship by the Portuguese government, Saramago moved to Spain, taking permanent residency in Lanzarote in the Canary Islands.

ISLANDS OF LANZAROTE

ISLANDS OF LANZAROTE

In 1996 José Saramago won the most prestigious award in the world for a writer – the Nobel Prize for Literature.

OOPS!

The reaction of the Portuguese government was muted and ambivalent. On the one hand the (very natural) desire to vaunt the achievement of a Portuguese citizen was offset by the writer’s evident hostility to the culture of his native shores to the extent of becoming a permanent resident of a Spanish island.

O Table

When the young 8-year-old Winston Churchill first went away to school, his glamorous mother rather vaguely took him there in the middle of the term. As her grand car disappeared down the drive, the headmaster took Churchill into his office, gave him a Latin Primer and told him to study the first page, then left the room.

Page one, in the time-honoured way of such primers, dealt with a declension of the substantive feminine noun: Mensa (table): nominative, vocative, accusative, genitive, dative and ablative: (a table, o table, table, of a table, to a table and by/with/from a table).

The young boy studied this in silence and, on the master’s return, he was sitting looking slightly bemused at this new information. The headmaster asked:

–              Well, young man, any problems?

–              No sir, I don’t think so sir, but I am rather puzzled by the vocative case …

–              Well the vocative is used when one addresses the object directly, for example «o table» … but you still don’t look convinced.

–              No I understand, sir; it’s just that in our house, we don’t generally speak to our furniture.

Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill

Winston Churchill, later in life, won the Nobel Prize for literature.

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